Maxim and development - The machine gun of WW1.

Definition of interrupter gear in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of interrupter gear.. Definitions for interrupter gear. A machine gun fitted with synchronization gear had the trigger normally disabled and the synchronizer mechanism would enable the trigger when the propeller was clear, essentially with the rotating parts of the.

Although the Gatling machine gun saw limited action during the American Civil War, by the time the Great War broke out, machine guns had undergone dramatic (not to mention deadly) improvements.

What’s the Difference? Machine Gun vs. Submachine Gun.

Machine-gun definition, to shoot at with a machine gun. See more.There are a total of ( 33 ) WW1 Service Rifles (1914-1918) entries in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below in alphanumeric order (1-to-Z). Flag images indicative of country of origin and not necessarily the primary operator.Dan Snow visits a secret location were heavy weapons can be safely fired to experiences firing WW1 machine guns himself. We learn that machine guns were a new weapon in WW1 and three guns are.


World War One gave rise to a number of slang and colloquial expressions such as blighty and cushy, but some lasted longer than others.Machine guns and tanks were used a lot because they were were more reliable than the Zeppelins. Main summary of other weapons While the infantry moved forward during a raid or attack the machine gun invariably proved impractical, both in terms of managing the machine gun itself but as much for the weight of the rounds of ammunition required to keep it serviceable.

Artillery was the most devastating weaponry of World War One, with some bombardments lasting for days and destroying landscapes.Indeed, many of the battlefields in France and Belgium still show the pock marks of artillery fire, and farmers regularly dig up shells when ploughing fields.

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The machine gun most commonly used throughout World War 1 was known as the Maxim gun, created by Hiram Maxim in 1884. This gun was an appropriated and more effective design to the Gatling gun which was used in.

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Machine guns and rapid-firing artillery, when used in combination with trenches and barbed-wire emplacements, gave a decided advantage to the defense, since these weapons’ rapid and sustained firepower could decimate a frontal assault by either infantry or cavalry.

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Artillery (heavy guns) played a big part in the battlefields of World War I. A bombardment that was aimed well could destroy enemy trenches, and knock out artillery batteries (groups of guns) and communication lines. It could also help break up an attack by infantry (soldiers on foot).

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The machine gun was the most widely used weapon in world war one. The guns were very heavy and had to be supported on a tripod. They also required three or four men to operate them. The men in this picture are also wearing gas masks for protection against gas attacks. This article is part of our extensive collection of articles on the Great War.

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The Vickers were replaced at battalion level by the Lewis light machine gun. Initially there were four in every Battalion, in a Lewis Gun Section and commanded by Second Lieutenant or a Lieutenant. Battle experience made the British Army realise it needed extra firepower, and by 1918 there were 36 Lewis Guns in every battalion.

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They needed powerful weapons to defend themselves against small but swift, aggressive hunters. Frenchman, Le Prieur realized the issue and integrated solid-fuel stick-guided missiles. It saw its first time in action during the battle of Verdun. In the hunters, the French also installed mobile machine guns to prevent back attacks.

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From 1918 to the mid-1930s the standard armament for a fighter aircraft remained two synchronized rifle-calibre machine guns, firing forward through the arc of the propeller.

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This list provides basic definitions of common First World War terms and abbreviations. It explains many of the abbreviations found in military personnel files, and directs readers to sections of NZHistory where more information is available about military units and campaigns.

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Introducing the Schlieffen Plan. The Schlieffen Plan was an operational plan used by the Germans to take over France and Belgium and carried out in August 1914. It was devised by and named after.

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