Inside the shocking brutality of Spanish bullfighting.

Ban Bullfighting in Spain has 5,399 members. Each year tens of thousands of Bulls are maimed, tortured and killed for entertainment in countries like.

BULLFIGHTING: THE FACTS THE MYTH. It seems hard to believe that in this so-called civilised age, a most vicious and cruel spectacle of blood continues to flourish in Spain and certain other countries. Bullfighting is barbaric and should have been banned long ago, as bear-baiting was. It is difficult to understand how crowds of people will pay money and take pleasure in watching one lone.

Bullfights in Spain - Seville Forum - Tripadvisor.

Bullfighting has been banned in at least 100 towns in Spain. The region of Catalonia, banned the so-called “sport” after officials were presented with the signatures of 180,000 residents demanding an end to the carnage. From 2008 to 2013, attendance in Spanish arenas fell by 40 percent. In 2008, about 3,300 bullfights were held in the country. In 2012, that figure dropped to fewer than.Bullfighting is a Spain tradition. Spain has been Bullfighting for years. If they banned Bullfighting many people would lose their jobs. Also the meat from the bull is cut up right after and usually donated to the homeless shelters. Last of all Bullfighting has been around for a really long time and hasn't caused any problems until now.Catalonia abolished bullfighting in 2010, and while Spain’s Constitutional Court overturned the Catalan ban in 2016, bullfighting has not returned to the region. 9 According to a 2016 Ipsos MORI survey, only 19 percent of Spaniards support bullfighting. 10 In Mexico, the states of Quintana Roo, Sonora, Guerrero and Coahuila have banned bullfighting. 11.


Throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance bullfighting in Christian Spain was almost exclusively performed by knights and noblemen on horseback. The bullfight as it is today has only existed since the 18th Century when the French, who found the bullfight repugnant, influenced the court to such an extent that noblemen lost interest. Groups of peasants who had worked for the nobility.As bullfighting developed the men on foot, who by their capework aided the horsemen in positioning the bulls, began to draw more attention from the crowd and the modern corrida began to take form. Today the bullfight is much the same as it has been since about 1726, when Francisco Romero of Ronda, Spain, introduced the estoque (the sword) and the muleta (the small, more easily wielded worsted.

Bullfighting in northern Spain is one of the region's most iconic traditions. Cherished by its aficionados and demonized by animal-rights activists, bullfighting has long been a popular sport.

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Bullfighting might have been banned in Barcelona, but it is still part of life in Lisbon. Adrian Mourby stayed at a hotel where guests are invited to meet the men behind this controversial spectacle.

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Bullfighting in Madrid is one of the more exciting experiences you can live in Spain. The most famous toreros and the bravest bulls come to Madrid Bullring Las Ventas every year. Madrid bullring Las Ventas is the most important bullring in the world. That is why getting tickets for bullfighting in Madrid is sometimes so hard.

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Merlin is a Bullfighting Pure Blood Lusitano stallion. This breed is possibly the oldest saddle horse in the world. The origins are in Portugal, but the strain is closely related to the Spanish Andalusian horse. Lusitanos have thick-neck, stiff muscles, gray, bay or chestnut hair and impressively tall bodies (62 and 63 inches, 157 and 160 cm). They are very brave and been used in combat in.

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Bullfighting is a physical contest that involves humans and animals attempting to publicly subdue, immobilize, or kill a bull is a physical contest that involves humans and animals attempting to publicly subdue, immobilize, or kill a bull.

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It’s thought that the Moors introduced some form of bullfighting in Andalucia after they invaded Spain in the 8th century. And one of Spain’s greatest heroes, El Cid (Right), is widely acclaimed to have been the first man to have slain a bull in an organised fight in the 11th century.

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Bullfighting - Bullfighting - History: Bullfighting’s exact origins are lost to history, though the spectacle seems to have many antecedents. Historians have long debated the relative weight to give to these various influences, and, for every historian who sees the seeds of the spectacle sown in Moorish Spain, there is a counter voice discoursing on the bull cults of ancient Mesopotamia or.

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A ban on bullfighting came into force in Spain's Catalonia region this year, after lawmakers voted for it last year - the first such ban in the country's mainland. The BBC's Christian Fraser in Paris says a recent opinion poll in France suggested 48% support for a ban, although earlier polls suggested as many as two-thirds of the French electorate would back a ban.

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Bullfighting. Writing in the 1950s, the travel writer H.V. Morton gave this account of a bullfight he saw in Seville. “The clock strikes. There is a roar of applause as the president enters his box, the only proof that Spaniards can keep an appointment to the second. He gives a signal, and as the gates swing wide there enters a bizarre procession which has reminded many observers of ancient.

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Because bullfighting is a dangerous sport, many toreros or matadors have been gored by the bull. Because of the violent nature of bullfighting it has begun to be prohibited in some countries. Many animal rights groups are fighting to put an end to bullfighting because it tortures the bulls and the horses that are used in the events.

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